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Marital Statistics #18339
11/09/10 12:38 PM
11/09/10 12:38 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
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L
LadyGrey Offline OP
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LadyGrey  Offline OP
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L
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Statistics get thrown around a a lot -- half of all marriages end in divorce, children of divorce are twice as likely to develop substance abuse, five percent of all WW's dye their hair pink -- ya know?

So I thought having a manual of statistics with supporting references might be helpful in stopping divorce.

If you all will post statistics that you think are relevant to stopping divorce on this thread, I will cull through them, distinguish studies that come up with dramatically different numbers, and put together a reference guide so that when we are using statistics to persuade a poster to stop divorce or support a poster in stopping his spouses' divorce, we will have the hard data handy to back up the numbers.


Bidden or not bidden God is present.
Re: Marital Statistics [Re: LadyGrey] #18457
11/09/10 05:25 PM
11/09/10 05:25 PM
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Chrysalis Offline
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SB, that is a great idea!


Chrysalis
Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Chrysalis] #18534
11/09/10 07:25 PM
11/09/10 07:25 PM
Joined: Oct 2010
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LadyGrey Offline OP
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I want the prize for the highest density of "stop divorce" per sentence.


Bidden or not bidden God is present.
Re: Marital Statistics [Re: LadyGrey] #18670
11/09/10 11:49 PM
11/09/10 11:49 PM
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Mark1952 Offline
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Seeks,

Let's start with CDC stats: Fast Stats

2005 Census numbers from Divorce Magazine: Article

From Dr Phil quoting various sources: Marriage and Divorce: The Statistics

From DivorceRate.org: Divorce Rates for the US and other countries

From Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance: U.S. Divorce Rates citing Barna Research

From About.com: Marriage Statistics

From DivorceStatistics.org: Statistics citing various sources

From the U.S. Census Bureau: Marriage and Divorce Statistics citing NCHS report

One I linked a day or so ago on another thread from The Daily Beast: 15 Ways to Predict Divorce

Barna's summary from 2008: The Barna Group

Let me know when you want a few more. Some I have bookmarked at home are now pretty old, dating back to 2001 or so.


mark1952.ma@gmail.com

I Was Thinking...

The secret to having a good marriage is to understand that marriage must be total, it must be permanent, and it must be equal.-- Frank Pittman
Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Mark1952] #112499
05/27/11 08:56 PM
05/27/11 08:56 PM
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Posts: 4,658
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LadyGrey Offline OP
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LadyGrey  Offline OP
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Mark, do you have any statistics handy on how divorce impacts kids?

I know I saw that here somewhere, but I can't find it.

I'm trying to consolidate into a single Word document all the links, etc., that I use the most or want to use but can't find so I give up.


Bidden or not bidden God is present.
Re: Marital Statistics [Re: LadyGrey] #112565
05/27/11 10:55 PM
05/27/11 10:55 PM
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Mark1952 Offline
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LG, (Congrats on the color change, BTW!)

I don't have a link handy with numbers or percentages, but have some conclusions from a study conducted by the U.S. Department of Health on the first page of my blog.

I might have a link bookmarked at home that I'll check on when I get there.

Quite a bit of research has been done about this with sort of mixed conclusions which I believe lies in part with the preconceived ideas of some of the researchers. Robert Emery, PhD, from the University of Virgina has done a lot of work. A small sample can be seen here: How Divorce Affects Children

The University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Service has published a short PDF on the effects of divorce on children. Here.

There is this from Sara Eleoff at The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine who says:
Quote:
  • Divorce and its ensuing ramifications can have a significant and life-altering impact on the well being and subsequent development of children and adolescents.
  • The consequences of divorce impact almost all aspects of a child's life, including the parent-child relationship, emotions and behavior, psychological development, and coping skills.
  • There is a significant need for child mental health professionals, along with other child specialists, to be cognizant of the broad spectrum of possible fall-out from a divorce and then to provide sufficient support for children of divorced parents in all the necessary psychosocial aspects of the child's life.
Short article from The Child Advocate here:Divorce Effects on Children

Here's an article that cites statistics without having to wade through the body of work to find them: 18 Shocking Statistics About
Children and Divorce
by Larry Bilotta. Each item in his list gives the source which can be found elsewhere.

Long term studies have been done in both the U.S. and Great Britain that can be accessed by subscribing to various organizations and websites, but the studies themselves can be mind numbing to gather any real information from. Generally the conclusions end up being cited somewhere in short order and this is where most of our "statistics" come from.

Significant "statistics" regarding children and divorce include:
  • About half of all children will witness the divorce of their parents before they are 18 years old.
  • About half of these children will witness the break up of the second marriage of one or both parents.
  • About 10% of them will see the break up of a third marriage of at least one parent.


Children whose parents are divorced are less likely to marry and more likely to divorce. They are about twice as likely to seek counseling as adults and are treated for such illnesses such as asthma at a rate of about 1/2 again as much as children from stable first marriages. They are nearly 3 times as likely to be the victims of sexual abuse and significantly more likely to drop out of school before completing high school. Children from happy marriages are 14% less likely to divorce than those from broken marriages. They tend to marry later and if you marry after the age of 25 your risk of divorce is reduced by 24%.

Now all of this is what I found in a single search using Google. None of it required going beyond the first page of the results to find it. Though I can't access the study because I am not a subscriber, I even found a study examining the differences between children of divorce and children who lost one parent to death, just by the time tested method of "browsing" the web and following links begun as a search.

One thing I did not find was any evidence that children of divorce have fewer or even statistically the same problems later in life as those of intact families. And for me that is the really telling part. While some anomaly might occur, statistically speaking, children from intact marriages fare better in life overall than those from broken marriages.

Is there a specific statistic )or set of same) you're looking for or just some general stuff?


mark1952.ma@gmail.com

I Was Thinking...

The secret to having a good marriage is to understand that marriage must be total, it must be permanent, and it must be equal.-- Frank Pittman
Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Mark1952] #113078
05/29/11 06:51 AM
05/29/11 06:51 AM
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Mark1952 Offline
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LG,

In no particular order, here are some links for you to take a look at.

http://www.biblenews1.com/marriage/marriags.htm#children

http://www.divorcereform.org/stats.html

http://www.cdc.gov/search.do?q=site%3Awww.cdc.gov%2Fnchs%2Fdata+filetype%3Apdf+children+and+divorce&submit1=Search

http://search.census.gov/search?q=childr...amp;site=census

The link to the CDC has the most information, I think, though a lot of it is old archived stuff. Searching the CDC site or the U.S. Census site can yield a lot of information, though you don't always find conclusions and summaries.

Whenever you see a link on a page you are looking at be sure to at least check it out. Many of the things I find are three, four, five or more links deep in my search and then some of them are only found by checking some of the websites thoroughly.


mark1952.ma@gmail.com

I Was Thinking...

The secret to having a good marriage is to understand that marriage must be total, it must be permanent, and it must be equal.-- Frank Pittman
Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Mark1952] #137865
07/21/11 04:36 AM
07/21/11 04:36 AM
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Lil Offline

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More stats from menstuff.org

Snippets
It's tough to get a handle on how many of us are having affairs, given the inherent secrecy.

* 22 percent of married men have strayed at least once during their married lives.
* 14 percent of married women have had affairs at least once during their married lives.
* Younger people are more likely candidates; in fact, younger women are as likely as younger men to be unfaithful.
* 70 percent of married women and 54 percent of married men did not know of their spouses' extramarital activity.
* 5 percent of married men and 3 percent of married women reported having sex with someone other than their spouse in the year1997.
* 22 percent of men and 14 percent of women admitted to having sexual relations outside their marriage sometime in their past.
* 90 percent of Americans believe adultery is morally wrong.
* 50 percent of Americans say President Clinton's adultery makes his moral standard "about the same as the average married man,'' according to a Time-CNN poll.
* 61 percent of Americans thought adultery should not be a crime in the United states; 35 percent thought it should; 4 percent had no opinion.
* 17 percent of divorces in the United States are caused by infidelity.
* Source: Associated Press
* Up to 37% of men and 22% of women admit to having affairs. Researchers think the vast majority of the millions of people who visit chat rooms, have multiple "special friends. Dr. Bob Lanier, askbob.com
* Recent studies reveal that 45-55% of married women and 50-60% of married men engage in extramarital sex at some time or another during their relationship (Atwood & Schwartz, 2002 - Journal of Couple & Relationship Therapy)
* Only 46% of men believe that online affairs are adultery. DivorceMag
* 80% think it's Ok to talk with a stranger identified as the opposite sex. 75% thinks it's ok to visit an adult site.
* About 60 percent of men and 40 percent of women will have an affair at some point in some marriage "Monogamy Myth", Therapist Peggy Vaugn
* About 24 percent of men and 14 percent of women have had sex outside their marriages, according to a Dec. 21, 1998 report in USA Today on a national study by the University of California, San Francisco.
* Affairs affect one of every 2.7 couples, according to counselor Janis Abrahms Spring, author of After the Affair,as reported by the Washington Post on March 30, 1999. Ten percent of extramarital affairs last one day, 10 percent last more than one day but less than a month, 50 percent last more than a month but less than a year, but 40 percent last two or more years. Few extramarital affairs last more than four years.
* A lesser known fact is that those who divorce rarely marry the person with whom they are having the affair. For example, Dr. Jan Halpers study of successful men (executives, entrepreneurs, professionals) found that very few men who have affairs divorce their wife and marry their lovers. Only 3 percent of the 4,100 successful men surveyed eventually married their lovers.
* Frank Pittman has found that the divorce rate among those who married their lovers was 75 percent. The reasons for the high divorce rate include: intervention of reality, guilt, expectations, a general distrust of marriage, and a distrust of the affairee.
* One-third of divorce litigation is caused by online affairs. This Is An Internet E-Mergency, The Fortino Group
* Approximately 70% of time on-line is spent in chat rooms or sending e-mail; of these interactions, the vast majority are romantic in nature. Dr. Michael Adamse, PhD., co-author of Affairs of the Net: The Cybershrinks' Guide to Online Relationships
* Because of the anonymity, affordability, and accessibility of Internet sexual resources, the computer can accelerate the transition from "at risk" to "addicted," as well as the progression of sex addiction in those with a history of prior sexual compulsivity. Cooper et al Survey
* 8-10 percent of Internet users become hooked on cybersex. Dr. Bob Lanier, askbob.com
* Spouses who get hooked on Internet porn are a growing complaint among spouses filing for divorce, according to a survey of 350 divorce attorneys. "If there's dissatisfaction in the existing relationship, the Internet is an easy way for people to scratch the itch," said lawyer J. Lindsey Short, Jr., president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, which conducted the study.
* 57% of people have used the Internet to flirt.
* 38% of people have engaged in explicit online sexual conversation and 50% of people have made phone contact with someone they chatted with online.
* Evidence proves there is a high correlation between on-line infidelity and subsequent real-time sexual affairs.
* Evidence supports the existence of disinhibition, accelerated intimacy, and hyper-sexual online behavior that can easily lead to real-time infidelity
* 31% of people have had an online conversation that has led to real-time sex.
* It is estimated that 53% of all people will have one or more affairs during their lifetime.
* Look at the numbers from Playboy Magazine:
* -2 out of 3 women and 3 out of 4 men admit they have sexual thoughts about co-workers.
* -86% of men and 81% of women admit they routinely flirt with the opposite sex.
* -75% of men and 65% of women admit to having sex with people they work with.
* The fact is that human beings are NOT monogamous by nature. That means they cheat.
* Experts say that a gut instinct is the most powerful indicator of a cheating lover. Adultery statistics state that 85% of woman who feel their lover is cheating are correct. 50% of men who feel their lover is cheating are right. The first clue is seldom obvious. Typically, it's a "feeling" that something is different.
* Cheating spouse statistics confirm that 50 and 70 percent of married men (between 38 and 53 million men) have cheated or will cheat on their wives. One study found that 2/3 of the wives (26 to 36 million women) whose husbands were cheating had no idea their husbands were having an affair - largely because they failed to recognize the telltale signs.
* According to Annette Lawson, author of Adultery, published in 1989 by Basic Books. "The various researchers arrive at a general consensussuggesting that above one-quarter to about one-half of married women have at least one lover after they are married in any given marriage. Married men probably still stray more often than married womenperhaps from 50 percent to 65 percent by the age of forty." According to Maggie Scarf, author of Intimate Partners, first published in 1987 by Random House, re-issued in 1996 by Ballentine.
* "Most experts do consider the 'educated guess' that at the present time some 50 to 65 percent of husbands and 45 to 55 percent of wives become extramaritally involved by the age of 40 to be a relatively sound and reasonable one." According to Peggy Vaughan, author of The Monogamy Myth, first published in 1989 by Newmarket Press (third edition published 2003).
* Conservative infidelity statistics estimate that 60 percent of men and 40 percent of women will have an extramarital affair. These figures are even more significant when we consider the total number of marriages involved, since it's unlikely that all the men and women having affairs happen to be married to each other. If even half of the women having affairs (or 20 percent) are married to men not included in the 60 percent having affairs, then at least one partner will have an affair in approximately 80 percent of all marriages. With this many marriages affected, it's unreasonable to think affairs are due only to the failures and shortcomings of individual husbands or wives."

Note that the above adultry statistics of the prevalence of affairs were made more than a decade ago; so based on changes in society during the intervening years, the current percentage of the population who have had affairs is probably somewhat HIGHER. For instance, the continuing increase of women in the workplace and the increase of women having affairs on the Internet means that the numbers for women having affairs is probably similar to those for menabout 60%.


AKA Lildoggie

Just found out about your spouses affair?
Infidelity Guide For The Betrayed Spouse


Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Lil] #137866
07/21/11 04:38 AM
07/21/11 04:38 AM
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Next article on the site: What do infidelity statistics mean?

Recent studies reveal that 45-55% of married women and 50-60% of married men engage in extramarital sex at some time or another during their relationship (Atwood & Schwartz, 2002 - Journal of Couple & Relationship Therapy)

Do these infidelity statistics seem a bit startling?... Or, Perhaps Not!

Basically, what these findings suggest is that approximately one half of all married men and women seek intimacy outside of their committed relationships.

But what does this really mean? Why are the number of men and women having extramarital affairs so high? I'll tell you - these staggeringly high infidelity figures mean that something is really lacking in their marriages to lead them to look else where.

Lacking... So is it Sex? Or something else?

This may come as a complete surprise, but most extramarital affairs are NOT about sex! If not sex, then what? Pay attention - the reason most people find intimacy with someone outside of their marriage is because their emotional needs are not being met. Yes, it's true! Most cases of infidelity are about wanting to feel emotionally connected to someone.

I realize that what I am suggesting may not be particularly popular, especially among men and women who are on the receiving end of infidelity. Clearly, finding out that your spouse or partner has cheated on you is both shocking and painful. Realizing that you are just another infidelity statistic is not something one is wants to flaunt.

The reality is that there are a lot of unsatisfying and empty relationships out there. However, the reason why infidelity statistics are as high as they are is because people place a higher value on their careers, children, friends or hobbies and not on their relationships with their partners. Think about it - if you neglect any of these others, certainly they would falter and fail. Is it not surprising that your relationship would likewise fail?

The bottom line is - if you want to avoid becoming yet another infidelity statistic, then you must nurture and prioritize your relationship with your spouse or partner. As you may have already figured out, just like planes, relationships cannot be maintained on "auto-pilot" indefinately.

Addictions, Co-Dependency & Family Functioning
Although my client base is self selecting and not representative of the general population, I am still amazed and distressed at the frequency with which addictions are part of my clients' lives.

When I first started out in private practice, I relied primarily upon formal diagnostic criteria (DSM-IV) as a means to identify the presence of an addiction. The DSM-IV provides a sound measure of substance abuse and dependence that is based on the frequency, amount and history as well as the substance's impact on a person's life. On its own, it provides a very acceptable way of assessing one aspect of an addiction problem.

Over the years, I have found that these criteria miss an important element in the addiction process; the impact a substance and/or an activity (and the resulting behavior) has on the family system. Today, while I still use the DSM-IV criteria, I have also incorporated more suble flags that take into account the intra-psychic, emotional, social and familial dimensions of addictions as well as the people with whom the addict associates.

I have catergorized these flags according to their relationship to the addict family member.

Codependency

Until recently, codependency was a concept that I have had great difficulty in understanding. However, after a number of years of working in the area of addictions, I have developed my own conceptualization of this term which is based on the dynamics I have observed in the relationships between a codependent and an addict. I see condependents as individuals who are reliant on an addict's dependency on a substance or activity (e.g., gambling, work, sex). In other words, it is the addict's dysfunctional behavior and the family's adaptation to it that directs and maintains the relationship between the addict and the codependent.

An intriguing aspect of codependency is the vital role the codependent plays in sustaining the relationship regardless how destructive, aversive or dysfunctional it is. The term, "enabling" is often used to describe this phenomenon and it refers to the codependent's role in preventing an addict from assuming responsibility for his or her behavior, life and future. In doing so, the codependent forestalls and blocks the necessary conditions that would likely lead the addict to seek help on his or her own. Some of these conditions might include facing legal and/or criminal consquences for his or her conduct, being fired from a job and being asked to leave a relationship. The codependent's efforts to help the addict by protecting, shielding and excusing his or her conduct are ineffective in remediating the problem or altering the addict's behaviour.

These are some of the characteristic flags of a codependent:

* they overcompensate
* they protect at all costs
* they second guess their own actions and often override common sense
* they have difficulties making decisions
* they struggle for control
* they live in a constant state of denial
* they make unreasonable compromises that seriously impact on their lives, their happiness and even their safety
* they remain committed to the addict inspite of his or her inability to do the same
* they maintain an unrealistic view that if "they" do the right things, their "addict" partner will change his/her behaviour
* they are vulnerable to the addict's manipulation, a major impediment to healing and change
* they place little value on their own needs and instead assume responsibility for those of the addict

These are some of the characteristic flags of an addict:

* they lack empathy toward others
* they have a narrow range of emotions (usually limited to anger/rage and elation)
* they tend to communicate on a superfiscial level finding it difficult to discuss their feelings
* they live in a constant state of denial
* they are unwilling to accept responsibility for their behavior and recovery
* they project their own inadequacies on others and blame others for their problems
* they are unable to keep promises or commitments
* they are highly manipulative
* albeit dysfunctional, their addiction is their method of coping with life's stressors

The power of an addiction cannot be overstated!

It consumes the addict's mind, body and soul as well as that of those who care for them. An addict's path of destruction is multidimensional as it affects family, friends and coworkers and is transmitted across generations. Even though an addict may regret his or her behavior or the distress it causes family members, the addict remains powerless to the effects of their addiction.

An addiction cannot be managed alone!

It requires the support and cooperation of a network of supporters. Conquering an addiction requires more than abstaining from the addictive behavior or activity because it involves examining and changing all the associated feelings and behaviors attached to the addiction. Moreover, the challenge of altering an addict's behavior and ultimately assisting him or her to overcome their addiction is made doubly hard because in order to do so, the behavior of the codependent also needs to change.

If you can identify with any of these "flags"... then you might want to consider examining HOW THEY RELATE TO YOU! ....and how and if... an ADDICTION might be.....


Research Conducted from a Gender Neutral Perspective: Criticisms and Rebuttals
Criticisms of research conducted from a gender neutral perspective have generally been directed at the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS) (Straus 1979) because it has been alleged to understate the victimization of women and overstate the violence by women (Straus 1990). Of the criticisms waged, the charges that the CTS fails to examine the context, initiation and consequences of abuse_are the most common.

Those who criticize the CTS for not considering these variables clearly lack an understanding of the purpose and the design of this measure. The CTS is a concise instrument that can be used in interview or self administered formats (Straus 1979) and has the capacity to generate data from large samples. It is designed to objectively measure a broad range of conflict resolving behaviours across varying populations. Straus (1990) argued that an examination of the context, initiation and consequences of abuse as part of the CTS would compromise its conciseness and would also assume a relationship between them and the CTS items. Family violence researchers have alternatively assessed these variables apart from the CTS and analysed their interaction effects (See Kaufman Kantor and Straus 1987; Sommer et al. 1992; Stets and Straus 1989).

In spite of the numerous papers criticizing the CTS, it continues to be the mostly widely used measure of family violence even among feminist researchers (DeKeseredy and Kelly 1995; Okun 1986) . Even when other measures have been employed, the overall estimates of abuse are still comparable (Straus 1993). With respect to the latter, when comparing my own findings based on a random sample of adult men and women living in Winnipeg, Manitoba and using the CTS, with those of the Violence Against Women Survey (Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics 1994) using a modified version of the CTS (e.g., added an item on sexual assault and collapsed threats and the use of a gun or knife into one item), the overall prevalence of abuse by men was 26.3%.,and 30%, respectively. Even without accounting for variability in abuse rates across the province or differences due to reporting sources, these two findings are nevertheless remarkably similar. Given the similarity in these findings, the question needed to be asked is why then are the estimates of female perpetrated abuse using the CTS or any other measure deemed less cogent. Perhaps what is really at issue is the failure of the patriarchal model to explain what it has long espoused.

The Politics of Family Violence Research in Academy

For me, the most troubling aspect of conducting gender neutral research has been coping with personal attacks. While the attack on The Battered Husband Syndrome was documented by media and academics, other examples of this type of intolerance are less well publicized.

In my own academic history, there have been a few occasions where I became convinced that my work was being criticized not on its academic merit, but rather because it did not mesh theoretically with what I have already described as a dominant feminist approach. Indeed, in one particular instance, my research received front page attention in a local newspaper. Soon after, the family violence perspective employed throughout my work, the credibility of my methodology, my understanding of the literature, and my insensitive commentary was the subject of heavy interrogation by fellow academics. Of course, this should not be unexpected in academia since dialogue and criticism are not only anticipated, but preferred. Indeed, early feminists often suffered and continue to endure marginalization and intolerance.

Whomever this type of academic censorship attacks, whether feminist or family violence researcher, the individual toll quite often results in the cultivation of vendettas and continued intolerance - an atmosphere antithetical to serious scholarship. How unfortunate it is when the advancement of ideology takes precedence over the pursuit of knowledge or the welfare of society. The most damaging effect is that instead of accepting the reality of female perpetrated violence, most feminists dismiss any data that do not mesh with a unidimensional patriarchal model. This tendency undermines their ability to cogently speak to woman initiated violence and stunts the progress of scholarship.

Conclusions

The evidence in this chapter points to researchers reluctance to move beyond a one dimensional view of domestic abuse to consider both mens and womens relationship to violence. This trepidation, fueled by personal politics or even fear of political and academic reprisal, remains an obstacle to understanding how power and control are negotiated within familial contexts specifically. Because the prevailing view of domestic abuse fails to recognize the interactive and reciprocal relations of violent incidents (and its antecedents), support for the needs of women, men and children living in abusive relationships is limited. Until domestic abuse is seen as a problem stemming from maladaptive family relations embedded within wider maladaptive social conditions, rather than the dysfunctional conduct of one individual, or perhaps one gender, viable solutions to family violence will not be forthcoming.


AKA Lildoggie

Just found out about your spouses affair?
Infidelity Guide For The Betrayed Spouse


Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Lil] #141139
07/31/11 08:16 AM
07/31/11 08:16 AM
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Lil Offline

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AKA Lildoggie

Just found out about your spouses affair?
Infidelity Guide For The Betrayed Spouse


Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Lil] #141263
08/01/11 03:48 AM
08/01/11 03:48 AM
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Originally Posted By: lildoggie
I have really mixed feelings about sites like the one linked to above. First, it seems like when a spouse decides to leave a marriage and break up the family, they have already decided that they can live with the consequences of their decision on their children and they disregard information like this because it doesn't fit their agenda. Second, the left behind spouse tortures themselves with these statistics, which is of course pointless because they cannot do anything about the divorce, only mitigate the damage. Third, sites like the one linked to above seem to imply a causal link between divorce and many bad outcomes - when in fact the links are most likely correlational.


we: me44 + my husband Pookie :9: + S9 + D6
Re: Marital Statistics [Re: flowmom] #141275
08/01/11 08:23 AM
08/01/11 08:23 AM
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Lil Offline

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A wayward is always going to view things through their own desires, and a BS is always going to find something to torture themselves with. I know.

It is a commonly queried topic and having stuff here is helpful. I remember searching for it way back when, and having it at hand might have stopped me compulsively searching.

Correlational - oh yes! I have been reading studies about children who are bought up by their grandparents. Now there's a bunch of stat's to warm the cockles of the grandparents hearts cry


AKA Lildoggie

Just found out about your spouses affair?
Infidelity Guide For The Betrayed Spouse


Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Lil] #250470
08/05/12 08:40 AM
08/05/12 08:40 AM
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Lil  Offline

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Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 7,569
New Zealand
An estimated six percent of American couples marry, divorce and then remarry each other, according to psychology professor Nancy Kalish, who researched the topic for her book Lost & Found Lovers: Facts and Fantasies of Rekindled Romances
http://glo.msn.com/beauty/we-got-remarried-to-each-other-1533156.story



AKA Lildoggie

Just found out about your spouses affair?
Infidelity Guide For The Betrayed Spouse


Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Lil] #251806
08/13/12 08:27 AM
08/13/12 08:27 AM
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 7,569
New Zealand
Lil Offline

Member
Lil  Offline

Member
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 7,569
New Zealand
Affairs affect one of every 2.7 couples, according to counselor Janis Abrahms Spring, author of After the Affair,as reported by the Washington Post on March 30, 1999. Ten percent of extramarital affairs last one day, 10 percent last more than one day but less than a month, 50 percent last more than a month but less than a year, but 40 percent last two or more years. Few extramarital affairs last more than four years. A lesser known fact is that those who divorce rarely marry the person with whom they are having the affair. For example, Dr. Jan Halpers study of successful men (executives, entrepreneurs, professionals) found that very few men who have affairs divorce their wife and marry their lovers. Only 3 percent of the 4,100 successful men surveyed eventually married their lovers. Frank Pittman has found that the divorce rate among those who married their lovers was 75 percent. The reasons for the high divorce rate include: intervention of reality, guilt, expectations, a general distrust of marriage, and a distrust of the affairee.


AKA Lildoggie

Just found out about your spouses affair?
Infidelity Guide For The Betrayed Spouse


Re: Marital Statistics [Re: Lil] #314163
09/12/13 02:38 AM
09/12/13 02:38 AM
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 7,569
New Zealand
Lil Offline

Member
Lil  Offline

Member
Joined: Aug 2010
Posts: 7,569
New Zealand
Not sure where they got this info from, but its interesting

Marriage Infidelity Statistics Data
Percent of marriages where one or both spouses admit to infidelity, either physical or emotional 41 %
Percent of men who admit to committing infidelity in any relationship theyve had 57 %
Percentage of women who admit to committing infidelity in any relationship theyve had 54 %
Percent of married men who have strayed at least once during their married lives 22 %
Percent of married women who have strayed at least once during their married lives 14 %
Percentage of men and women who admit to having an affair with a co-worker 36 %
Percentage of men and women who admit to infidelity on business trips 35%
Percentage of men and women who admit to infidelity with a brother-in-law or sister-in-law 17 %
Average length of an affair 2 years
Percentage of marriages that last after an affair has been admitted to or discovered 31 %
Percentage of men who say they would have an affair if they knew they would never get caught 74 %
Percentage of women who say they would have an affair if they knew they would never get caught 68 %
Percent of children who are the product of infidelity 3 %

Statistics Brain


AKA Lildoggie

Just found out about your spouses affair?
Infidelity Guide For The Betrayed Spouse



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